Rv Site – TV Resort Marina http://tvresortmarina.com/ Sun, 26 Sep 2021 10:56:09 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://tvresortmarina.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png Rv Site – TV Resort Marina http://tvresortmarina.com/ 32 32 Supervisory Board Advances RV Park in Parks, Despite Citizen Appeal | Local https://tvresortmarina.com/supervisory-board-advances-rv-park-in-parks-despite-citizen-appeal-local/ Sun, 26 Sep 2021 01:00:00 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/supervisory-board-advances-rv-park-in-parks-despite-citizen-appeal-local/ Residents are particularly concerned about the potential for increased off-road vehicle traffic such as ATVs and buggies that visitors might bring and have become ever-growing problems in rural counties and western forest lands. But the developer says it is taking action to limit the impacts of the RV fleet, and county staff say the impacts […]]]>

Residents are particularly concerned about the potential for increased off-road vehicle traffic such as ATVs and buggies that visitors might bring and have become ever-growing problems in rural counties and western forest lands.

But the developer says it is taking action to limit the impacts of the RV fleet, and county staff say the impacts on traffic will be limited.

With the only public entrance to the RV park on the old Route 66, county traffic engineers said the project would not generate enough traffic to require construction of new turning lanes.

“Yes, the number of vehicles is increasing, there will be more vehicles on the road, but really anyone driving on that section should not be affected,” said Nick Hall, county traffic engineer.

A second road would provide emergency access to the park and allow vehicles to exit onto North Parks Road.

Additionally, the developer said it will not allow visitors to drive ATVs or strollers in the park, which will prevent visitors from riding them in the community.

Visitors would be required to transport these vehicles off site prior to unloading and using them.

And in the end, the supervisory board unanimously sided with the developer.


Source link

]]>
The 6 best portable ice makers for camping https://tvresortmarina.com/the-6-best-portable-ice-makers-for-camping/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 12:30:25 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/the-6-best-portable-ice-makers-for-camping/ When you’re RV camping, it’s nice to have extra ice on hand without having to worry about trays in your freezer or do a last minute errand at the store. The best portable ice makers for camping are quick and easy to use, saving you time and money, and some even offer self-cleaning features. There […]]]>

When you’re RV camping, it’s nice to have extra ice on hand without having to worry about trays in your freezer or do a last minute errand at the store. The best portable ice makers for camping are quick and easy to use, saving you time and money, and some even offer self-cleaning features. There are a few key things to consider when shopping:

  • Speed: Why have an ice maker if it takes hours to make a batch of ice cubes? Many machines will specify how long it takes per cycle of nine cubes. (The options below range from six to 10 minutes). You can also check the capacity of the machine, which indicates how much ice it can produce in a 24 hour period and can drop from 25 to 45 pounds.
  • Machine size: Think about how much space you have on your RV counter and how much ice you plan to drive through on your camping trip. If you plan to use a lot of it, look for a larger ice cube basket and water tank.
  • Ice cube size: The type of ice cubes you want may vary depending on how you use them. Bigger cubes are generally better for sipping cocktails, for example, while smaller cubes tend to be better for mashing in smoothies. If this versatility is important to you, look for a machine that can do both.
  • Cleanliness: When it comes to ice makers, cleanliness is very important because, in addition to being unhealthy, dirty ice makers can produce unwanted tastes and odors. For convenience, some of the options below provide some form of self-cleaning mode.

To help you keep your cool in nature, here are the best portable ice makers for camping.

1. This incredibly popular ice maker which has over 5,000 fans on Amazon

Dimensions: 12.2 by 9.06 by 12.8 inches

Capacity: 26 pounds

Storage room: 1.25 pounds (ice basket); 1.89 liters (water tank)

What’s good: With over 5,500 impressive positive reviews on Amazon, this popular Igloo Countertop Ice Maker is a fan favorite on the site. The fast and convenient machine, which takes just seven minutes to make nine ice cubes, offers two different sizes of cylindrical cubes. The small and compact ice maker, made with food grade material that reduces odor, also features an automated five-cycle cleaning system. Available in five colors, it has an easy to use control panel with LED lights. Better yet, it’s one of the smallest, otherwise the smallest option on this list.

One reviewer wrote: “We bought it for our motorhome. Everyone said running out of ice was a problem and wished they had one. […] I did some research and opted for this one. We were not disappointed ! We had ice cubes in 10 minutes. And they kept coming. We will use it in the house when we are not camping. Easy to clean. Works extremely fast. Delighted with this product !! “

2. An ultra-portable ice maker with a convenient spoon hook

Dimensions: Unspecified

Capacity: 26 pounds

Storage room: 1.5 pounds (ice basket); 2 liters (water tank)

What’s good: At 26 pounds, this portable ice maker has the same capacity as the first – and cycles are slightly faster at six minutes. The main difference is that the water tank and the ice cube basket are slightly bigger. Like the Igloo model, this one has food grade material inside with a self-cleaning system to prevent odor – and it can make two sizes of ice cubes. As an added bonus, the quiet 15.4-pound machine, which has a noise level of less than 45 decibels, has a handy hook on the side for hanging your ice scoop.

One reviewer wrote: “This ice maker was exactly what I was looking for! Small but big in design. The ice cream came out perfectly made and works as it should. Extremely happy with this purchase. The ice is the perfect size for your everyday drinks!

3. A sleek and simple ice maker, available in black or silver

Dimensions: 14.09 by 9.65 by 11.54 inches

Capacity: 33 pounds

Storage room: 2 books (ice cream basket); 2.36 liters (water tank)

What’s good: Another popular option on Amazon, this mini ice maker has nearly 2,000 positive reviews. The mid-size machine offers a bit more space than the first two options, with a 33-pound capacity and a 2-pound ice bucket. The fast ice maker, which can pump nine ice cubes in seven minutes (in two different sizes), has a simple control panel with bright LED lights. Plus, it has a transparent cover so you can watch the ice cream while it is working. While the materials aren’t specified, it’s safe to assume they meet the high quality of other Igloo models, and you can choose from a black or silver exterior. The only downside is that it doesn’t have a self-cleaning mode.

One reviewer wrote: “Works fantastic and makes a ton of ice cream pretty quickly. Super easy to clean. There is a plug on the bottom that you pull out to drain the water and rinse with fresh water. Handy when camping or having a party and need ice cream !! ”

4.This versatile option that also dispenses cold water

Dimensions: 14.4 by 16.7 by 17.8 inches

Capacity: 48 pounds

Storage room: 4.5 pounds (ice basket); water tank not specified

What’s good: If you’re looking for a bigger option, this two-in-one countertop ice maker and the water cooler is just the ticket. With a 48-pound capacity and a 4.5-pound ice storage basket, it can produce a larger amount of ice, making it a fantastic choice for large families or for people who like to camp with friends. . And he can have ice cream ready to go in just six to 10 minutes. It is made with food grade material inside (although it is not self-cleaning) and it has a simple and easy to use LED control panel. A key distinction, besides the size, is that this machine dispenses cold water as well – it even has a nice spout on the side. Another difference is that you can connect it to standard 2, 3, or 5 gallon water jugs to keep the tank flowing for longer. (Remember they are not included.)

One reviewer wrote: “This is one of my favorite purchases for my motorhome! I have it in my outdoor kitchen and find myself drinking more water and the ice maker is perfect for cocktails and for keeping ice in my cooler. My kids also think it’s really cool to drink water because they can get it on their own.

5. This mini ice maker which can make two sizes of cubes

Dimensions: 13.89 by 9.85 by 13 inches

Capacity: 26.5 lbs

Storage room: 2.2 pounds (ice basket); 1.7 liters (water tank)

What’s good: This small ice maker, which is similar in capacity to the top two picks on this list, is another cult favorite on Amazon. Boasting over 1,300 five-star reviews, fans have rated it as fast and efficient. Constructed of food grade ABS plastic and stainless steel, it can make nine ice cubes in five to eight minutes, and it cleans itself with an automated function (simply hold down the “self-clean” button for five seconds). The popular machine, which makes two sizes of bullet-shaped ice cream, is built with a transparent viewing window. It is also available in a larger version.

One reviewer wrote: “We love our ice maker, it’s perfect for our camping trips. Very easy to use. You have 2 choices of large and small ice cubes; Once you press the button, you will have ice cubes ready in 5-7 minutes. Very impressed so far with the quality, design and practicality. I would highly recommend to anyone looking for a portable ice maker.

6. A fast countertop machine that also makes crushed ice

Dimensions: 14.9 x 15.7 x 16.5 inches

Capacity: 44 lbs

Storage room: 6.6 lbs (ice basket); 3 liters (water tank)

What’s good: Another larger option with a 44-pound capacity, this high quality ice maker can make 18 cubes in one cycle, which is double that of many other options. At 11 minutes, the cycle is slightly longer than the others; However, this greatly speeds up the overall production time. The best part is that while it’s faster and bigger (with a 6.6-pound ice storage basket), it doesn’t take up much more space on your counter. It’s made from a food-grade material that’s odor-resistant, and reviewers have noted that the drain plug makes it easy to clean (although there’s no automated feature). As a bonus, it’s the only product on the list that also makes crushed ice.

One reviewer wrote: “I have used this ice maker before on a trip in our motorhome. It worked very well; make a lot of ice cream. It is not too heavy and was easy to use.


Source link

]]>
Oregon State Parks to Charge 25% More Out-of-State Visitors for RV Campgrounds https://tvresortmarina.com/oregon-state-parks-to-charge-25-more-out-of-state-visitors-for-rv-campgrounds/ Sat, 25 Sep 2021 01:25:36 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/oregon-state-parks-to-charge-25-more-out-of-state-visitors-for-rv-campgrounds/ (Update: Video added, Oregon State Parks spokesperson commentary, Tumalo Park visitor) TUMALO, Ore. (KTVZ) – Out-of-state visitors who rent an RV campsite in an Oregon state park will soon have to pay 25% more than a resident of Oregon renting the same campsite. Residents of Oregon currently pay license fees to register recreational vehicles with […]]]>

(Update: Video added, Oregon State Parks spokesperson commentary, Tumalo Park visitor)

TUMALO, Ore. (KTVZ) – Out-of-state visitors who rent an RV campsite in an Oregon state park will soon have to pay 25% more than a resident of Oregon renting the same campsite.

Residents of Oregon currently pay license fees to register recreational vehicles with the DMV. These fees help maintain Oregon State Parks.

Chris Havel, spokesperson for Oregon State Parks, said on Friday that adding the surcharge to out-of-state visitors who come with RVs and stay at campgrounds is supposed to help them also contribute to the maintenance of state parks.

Attendance at national parks has continued to increase in recent years.

“Over the past five years, from 2014 to 2019, we’ve broken records every year,” Havel said.

He said the surcharge will help maintain the characteristics that attract people to state park campsites.

“We provide electrical, water and sewer hookups at a site because we know that’s what people expect from an experience in an Oregon state park,” he said. declared Havel.

Debbie Byes, a Colorado resident camping at Tumalo State Park on Friday afternoon, said she travels to Oregon often. She said she always has a pleasant experience visiting and understands why the supplement is needed.

“I fully support him. We can come here and enjoy the beauty of Oregon, and if it costs a little more and helps in any way the outdoor community, we are more than happy to pay for that, ”Byes said.

The Oregon Department of Parks and Recreation has formed a committee to discuss and finalize the RV camping changes, under the terms of Oregon Senate Bill 794, passed by lawmakers earlier this year.

Guidelines for the changes are expected to be announced next month and take effect in early 2022.


Source link

]]>
Lacey feels blinded by county’s plan to park RVs near town https://tvresortmarina.com/lacey-feels-blinded-by-countys-plan-to-park-rvs-near-town/ Fri, 24 Sep 2021 12:30:00 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/lacey-feels-blinded-by-countys-plan-to-park-rvs-near-town/ ]]>

title=RV site for homeless people.” loading=”lazy”/>

An aerial view of a county property parcel near the corner of Martin Way and Carpenter Road Northeast in Lacey, Washington on Friday, May 24, 2019. The parcel is under consideration as a future RV site for homeless people.

joshua.bessex@gateline.com

Lacey City Council bemoaned the state of communications between the city and the county on Thursday after the council learned that a site near the city is considered a destination for those living outside of their campervans.

The site is a parcel of land near the corner of Martin Way East and Carpenter Road Northeast, which was once considered a possible destination for a homeless mitigation site in 2019. The land is owned by the county, but is located also at Lacey’s. urban growth area.

The motorhome proposal apparently emerged at a Regional Housing Council meeting on Wednesday, which was attended by Lacey City Councilor Carolyn Cox, the council’s representative to the group, and Lacey City Manager Scott Spence. .

City Councilor Lenny Greenstein is Lacey’s replacement for the group.

Details of the Area Housing Council meeting were not discussed in detail by Lacey’s council on Thursday – and how far the proposal has advanced was unclear – but Cox offered some highlights.

According to Cox, the county is considering 15 to 20 vehicles at the site and perhaps just seniors living in their campervans. She also said the site was considered temporary and that county manager Ramiro Chavez had initial discussions with a nearby business owner which apparently went well.

Cox also said the county has prepared a communications plan for the site that is not quite ready.

Still, even Cox wasn’t thrilled with the process leading up to the proposal.

“Communication needs to improve, and I insisted before going out with this plan, to share it with Lacey,” Cox said, apparently to a county official. “There is also the issue of law enforcement and how we might be affected there. “

Other Lacey board members agreed.

“I would like to look someone in the eye and ask, ‘Are we going to be partners in the future or what’s going on here? “Lacey Mayor Andy Ryder said. “Why weren’t we involved if that’s what’s going to happen?” He said of the site.

Greenstein added that the lack of communication worsened when the city overheard owners of neighboring businesses talking about activity at the site. Greenstein checked with the county and learned that the equipment had been moved and that previously scheduled work unrelated to the RV proposal had taken place at the site.

“It would have been nice to know that first,” said Mayor Ryder.

City Councilor Michael Steadman said communication between the city and the county continues to be poor.

“In general, there is a lack of communication,” he said. “We need to be transparent so that we can communicate with our citizens about what is going on. “

Rolf has been with The Olympian since August 2005. He covers breaking news, Lacey’s town and business for the newspaper. Rolf graduated from Evergreen State College in 1990.


Source link

]]>
San Jose officials aim to reduce homelessness and plague in the neighborhood https://tvresortmarina.com/san-jose-officials-aim-to-reduce-homelessness-and-plague-in-the-neighborhood/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 23:02:12 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/san-jose-officials-aim-to-reduce-homelessness-and-plague-in-the-neighborhood/ Proposals aim to boost emergency housing, jobs and reduce illegal dumping SAN JOSÉ, CA – San José Mayor Sam Liccardo and San José City Council members Sergio Jimenez, Raul Peralez, David Cohen, Dev Davis, Pam Foley and Matt Mahan announced bold solutions to tackle the crisis homeless people and beautify the city. Their proposals, outlined […]]]>

Proposals aim to boost emergency housing, jobs and reduce illegal dumping

SAN JOSÉ, CA – San José Mayor Sam Liccardo and San José City Council members Sergio Jimenez, Raul Peralez, David Cohen, Dev Davis, Pam Foley and Matt Mahan announced bold solutions to tackle the crisis homeless people and beautify the city.

Their proposals, outlined in two separate memos, introduce a new initiative calling for a “compassionate and clean San José” that would triple the number of quick-build apartments in the city and double efforts to clean up neighborhoods.

The plan follows the announcement of the “America HouseAnd mobilize an unprecedented amount of federal and state funding available to address the homelessness crisis. The plan would bring the city’s total number of quick-build apartments – also known as emergency housing – to 1,000 under construction or completed by the end of 2022 and continue Homekey’s funding for 300 units. additional hotel / motel, which would reduce the homeless population of San José. more than 20%. The proposals also call for quadruple the current number of posts for San José Bridge – which employs homeless residents of San José in vocational training programs as they work to beautify the city – from 50 to 200.

The proposals call for an expansion of efforts to tackle illegal dumping, including the introduction of monetary rewards for those who cite illegal dumping activities, and the deployment of cameras at illegal dumping hot spots. Finally, the proposals call for an update to the vehicle reduction program approach, which was changed during shelter-in-place and operated in a hybrid model that responds to complaints from residents and includes some proactive enforcement.

On Monday, Mayor Liccardo joined US HUD Secretary Marcia Fudge by launching the Biden administration’s “House America” initiative, to achieve bold goals by December 2022 to house our homeless neighbors. Mayor Liccardo announced that San José’s “House America” goal is to relocate 1,500 people and advance the creation of 2,300 new transitional and permanent housing units – thanks to this proposal and to developments posted by measure A – by December 2022. As of January 2020, the city’s efforts, in collaboration with Santa Clara County, the Housing Authority, Destination: Home and a constellation of partner nonprofits, have relocated nearly 4,900 homeless residents.

“We have the opportunity to deploy an unprecedented level of resources to get things done and tackle two of our city’s most pressing challenges: providing housing solutions to homeless residents and fighting the scourge on our streets,” said the mayor of San José, Sam Liccardo. “We have proven that homes can be built in months rather than years, and at a fraction of the cost. We have also demonstrated the effectiveness of SJ Bridge, providing jobs for homeless residents while fighting the scourge. In the coming year, we must redouble our efforts and accelerate these efforts.

Homeless

Homeless

In 2019, the punctual census (PIT) counted 6,097 homeless residents in San José, including 5,117 homeless. In response to the pandemic, the City used prefabricated modular construction to quickly build three emergency interim housing communities for 317 previously homeless people, couples and families. The first proposal from mayor and council members Sergio Jimenez (D2), Raul Peralez (D3), Pam Foley (D9) and Matt Mahan (D10), will triple the emergency housing capacity to a total of 1,000 by adding 683 quick-build apartments. and continue funding State Homekey to acquire 300 hotel / motel units. This will increase housing capacity countywide from 28% to 54.4%, and reduce the homeless population by more than 20% in San José.

Funding

To fund the development of the quick-build apartments, the mayor and council members propose to leverage the unprecedented amount of funding San José is eligible for through Homekey, ARPA and a historic HHAP investment in local municipalities made possible by the efforts. advocacy campaign by mayors of major cities in California. The modular units would be spread across six sites in the six municipal districts that do not currently host a transitional housing site, and would prioritize housing for unprotected residents in the immediate surrounding neighborhoods to ensure that the entire community benefits directly from hosting an emergency housing site. The mayor and council members are also offering incentives for private landowners with large parking lots who might be willing to accommodate a transitional housing community given the limited availability of land.

In addition to emergency housing construction, the plan includes recommendations to add a temporary secure parking site for homeless residents living off RVs in District 2, and an aggressive approach to encourage the development of a sobering up center where treatment options can be identified for those arrested. for criminal offenses while actively under the influence of a drug.

Homeless camp

Scourge of the neighborhood

The second proposal, “Clean San José” from mayor and council members David Cohen (D4), Dev Davis (D6), Pam Foley (D9) and Matt Mahan (D10), calls for quadruple the San José Bridge program , of which Mayor Liccardo recently announced an extension. The program currently has 50 participants. The most recent proposed expansion will allow an additional 100 residents on top of the planned expansion for a total of 200 bridging jobs, as well as adding up to 250 additional litter hotspots for frequent cleaning.

The memoranda from Compassionate and Clean San Jose will be heard at the Rules Committee meeting on September 29, 2021.
The press conference is available here.

San José Council Members:

Municipal Councilor Sergio Jimenez, District 2
“I am proud to work with the mayor and my colleagues to accelerate temporary housing solutions. As a City and as a society, we must prioritize the removal of people from the streets. I am particularly looking forward to partnering with the mayor in temporarily locating a “secure parking” site for recreational vehicles in or near the future police training center in my district. “

Councilor Raul Peralez, District 3
“It is important that we consider all opportunities to build more housing for our most vulnerable across the city, while providing human care and services. The faster these sites can be developed, the sooner we can break the cycle of chronic homelessness.

City Councilor David Cohen, District 4
“The scourge in our city is unacceptable at all levels and our community is counting on us to improve the City’s response. Ensuring that our homeless residents have access to employment opportunities as they work towards stable housing is essential to measurably improve the quality of life for all residents of San José. Additionally, we cannot expect residents’ statements to be the only source of identification of illegal landfills. Recording these known hot spots is an important tool to ensure that people who dump illegally are penalized and held accountable. “

Dev Davis Board Member, District 6
“Illegal dumping must stop and we must tackle what is happening on the streets now. It will take effort and money. By using American Recovery Plan Act dollars to employ homeless people through the San Jose Bridge Transitional Jobs Program, we can give people an income and clean our streets, streams and roads.

Board Member Pam Foley, District 9
“San José has a moral obligation to house every homeless person living on our streets, especially our homeless children and families. By building more housing for more people in our city, we can achieve this moral imperative. “

Board Member Matt Mahan, District 10
“All of us, including the homeless, deserve to live in a safe, clean and caring city. I strongly support the identification of public land for cost-effective, quick-build bridging housing and continue to call on the county to act quickly to identify the land we need to end street homelessness in our region. community.

MAIN EVENT IN DOWNTOWN LINCOLN

Lincoln Showcase


Source link

]]>
RV campers say prayers and leave tributes where Gabby Petito’s remains were found https://tvresortmarina.com/rv-campers-say-prayers-and-leave-tributes-where-gabby-petitos-remains-were-found/ Thu, 23 Sep 2021 00:28:57 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/rv-campers-say-prayers-and-leave-tributes-where-gabby-petitos-remains-were-found/ VSAleb Key and his mother Marianne had been determined to pay homage to Gabby Petito ever since they learned her body had been found on this tranquil mountainside. The seven-year-old wanted to leave something natural, not plastic flowers, but rather something that complements the environment. So he fashioned a simple little cross of twigs and […]]]>

VSAleb Key and his mother Marianne had been determined to pay homage to Gabby Petito ever since they learned her body had been found on this tranquil mountainside.

The seven-year-old wanted to leave something natural, not plastic flowers, but rather something that complements the environment. So he fashioned a simple little cross of twigs and vines, with a base carved from a piece of bark.

And on Wednesday, the young boy and his mother made their way across the pebble-strewn riverbed where the 22-year-old YouTuber’s remains were found, to leave their own tribute near a makeshift pebble cross. , shaped in the sand a day or two earlier.

“We were going to add a little paper prayer, but we forgot to bring the tape,” said the youngster.

In the coming days, there will likely be many more, like Ms. Key and her son, drawn to the Spread Creek Campground to pay homage to Ms. Petito, whose plight has caught the attention of many Americans.

FBI confirms Gabby Petito’s remains were found in Wyoming

Already, it seems, there are a lot of people driving all the way to the camping area, 20 miles north of Jackson, Wyoming, just to roll down their windows, breathe in the fresh air, and watch where a drama is happening. real happened. a tragic end.

Ms Key and her son were with the boy’s grandparents, John and Suzanne Kay, all from San Antonio, Texas, but who – like so many encounters in Bridger-Teton National Park – said they were “Full-time caravanners”. RV stands for recreational vehicle, basically a large motorhome.

Their next stop was North Dakota, then Minnesota, where the older Ms. Kay had a job processing sugar beets.

Did they think that many people would now come and make this place a great memorial?

“I don’t know. It’s the remoteness that might make it difficult for some,” Kay said.

His wife said they knew another family of RV campers, Brian and Jenn Bethune, who discovered they had inadvertently filmed the White Ford Transit van used by Ms Petito and Mr Laundrie, when she was parked here on August 27. Information proving the van had been at the campsite was passed to the FBI, who praised members of the public for their help.

“We have a kind of connection with the Bethunes,” said Suzanne Kay.

The other Ms Kay said the RV community cares about itself.

“We always try to help each other,” she said. She said her son’s father, Scott, passed away almost three years ago. Caleb said he believed Ms. Petito was with God, Jesus and her father.

Chuck Neese was the first camper to extend the creek and said it was a beautiful place

(Andrew Buncombe)

A man named Boomerang also said a prayer for Ms. Petito. On Tuesday, the FBI announced that an autopsy had confirmed that the remains found last Sunday were those of Ms Petito and that she had lost her life as a result of homicide, meaning she was killed by a other person.

Boomerang, 61, said he spends much of his time hiking long-distance trails such as the 3,000-mile Continental Divide Trail. His visit to Spread Creek was part of his path to a “transition” to a larger society.

“I didn’t know the whole story, but someone told me,” he said. “So last night I said a prayer for her spirit, mainly to express remorse and say sorry to her.”

When asked if he thought the campsite would now attract more tourists or people wishing to pray, he replied, “I think there will be a lot of people who will want to come and pay their respects.

Chuck Neese, sitting outside his Winnebago Minnie Winnie campervan, said he believed he was the first camper to return to the site, after it opened to the public on Tuesday.

Usually the site was crowded, he said, but when he arrived yesterday morning there was no one there.

There were, however, a lot of members of the media. He said he asked a ranger what they were all doing there.

On Tuesday, authorities confirmed Gabby Petito’s remains had been found and said she was the victim of a homicide.

(Youtube)

“You know, he told me he thought they were all here to cover something on trout fishing,” he said with a laugh. “I knew there was no way, that a lot of the media was covering trout fishing.”

He eventually said a member of the press told him about the search for Ms Petito, the discovery of her remains and the ongoing search for her boyfriend, Brian Laundrie.

Did he think that living together, locked in a van or months in a row, could add new pressure to a relationship? “I actually think it makes people calmer.”

Mr Neese, 66, single and the father of a 35-year-old son, said he worked remotely for a group that oversaw repairs to a group of churches in Alabama.

“We have 70,000 people in our churches, even during the pandemic,” he said.

He said that already many tourists had come to look at the bed of the river, he said. He said he skimmed over the conversation between a couple, when a man said he wanted to take home a piece of wood he had picked up. The woman didn’t want him to take it.

“He said ‘But it could be related to history,’” Mr Neese said.

Despite working remotely, Mr Neese said he had heard nothing about Ms Petito’s disappearance or the coroner’s discovery. Yet last night, after learning the gist of the story from a reporter, he read about it.

“I went on the gravel bed yesterday and knelt to pick up rocks,” he said. “And I thought if this was the last place she was alive, it was a very beautiful place.”


Source link

]]>
“It’s not my favorite way of life”: where night-time motorhomes can be and when are deadlocked in city discussions https://tvresortmarina.com/its-not-my-favorite-way-of-life-where-night-time-motorhomes-can-be-and-when-are-deadlocked-in-city-discussions/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 22:55:09 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/its-not-my-favorite-way-of-life-where-night-time-motorhomes-can-be-and-when-are-deadlocked-in-city-discussions/ Ron lives on Delaware Avenue, in a row of RVs and trailers, in his 31-foot-long RV. The self-proclaimed “local native”, 68, has been walking around the Natural Bridges area for a few months, but has been living in the RV since 2016. “It’s not my favorite way of life,” said Ron, who asked to keep […]]]>

Ron lives on Delaware Avenue, in a row of RVs and trailers, in his 31-foot-long RV. The self-proclaimed “local native”, 68, has been walking around the Natural Bridges area for a few months, but has been living in the RV since 2016.

“It’s not my favorite way of life,” said Ron, who asked to keep his last name anonymous. “That’s what I did in an emergency, and the emergency turned into a long-term affair.”

Ron said he previously owned a home in Ben Lomond and worked as an engineer in Silicon Valley for almost 30 years. But he lost everything in 2013 after his wife died, and he went bankrupt after his retirement funds collapsed amid the recession. He bought a motorhome to live in, thinking it would be temporary, but even with a Section 8 housing voucher, he hasn’t been able to find affordable housing for years.

Ron thought his RV life would be temporary, but it didn’t work out that way.

(Kevin Painchaud / Santa Cruz Belvedere)

“I want to be on the sidelines,” he said. “I don’t want to be a problem for anyone.”

But Ron lives in one of the 65 or so oversized vehicles that frequent the Lower Westside, which puts him in the crosshairs of a growing mess among neighborhood groups, housing advocates and the municipal government on where vehicle inhabitants can park safely and legally overnight.

In 2020, Delaware Avenue and Natural Bridges Drive saw by far the city’s highest number of vehicle downsizing cases, and neighbors are unhappy, citing parking, sanitation and safety concerns. After what Santa Cruz Police Chief Andy Mills described as decades of community complaints, city council may finally ban RV parking – with a few exceptions.

“The goal of the ordinance is balance,” said Mills, referring to the need for both compassion and responsibility.

In a special meeting on Tuesday, the Santa Cruz City Council introduced amendments to an ordinance that would ban all parking for oversized vehicles on any public thoroughfare, street, lane or city parking lot between midnight and 5 a.m. unless the vehicle has a specific permit from the city, among other exemptions. The ordinance would also call for expanding the city’s safe parking options, where RVers could park for free at night.

A “win-win”?


“We’re really trying to make this a win-win for everyone in the community,” board member Renee Golder said at the meeting.

Golder, along with Deputy Mayor Sonja Brunner and Councilor Shebreh Kalantari-Johnson, advanced the conversation, which stems from the the city’s political discussions on camping last spring. Brunner said council members also hoped to reconsider a similar 2015 ordinance, which banned overnight parking for oversized vehicles between 8 p.m. and 8 a.m. – without offering a permit system or safe parking program.

Sonja brunner

Sonja Brunner.

(Provided by Sonja Brunner)

In 2016, the California Coastal Commission appealed the order, noting the city’s failure to provide alternative parking solutions and data.

This time around, the city braced for court challenges from the commission: it proposed delaying enforcement of the ordinance until the city has expanded its permit program or created a secure parking program. equivalent in the county. For both of these options, the vehicles must have been registered in Santa Cruz for at least six months – a point several council members and homeless advocates have pointed out as a potential barrier for the homeless community.

On top of that, advocates say that just paying for registration can be a barrier.

“These people live in poverty and often cannot afford to register,” Kayla Kumar, local organizer and former city council candidate, told Lookout.

The amount that many have counted in the quote fee is staggering.

The amount that many have counted in the quote fee is staggering.

(Kevin Painchaud / Santa Cruz Belvedere)

As currently proposed, permits for persons qualified as “residents” would be valid for one year and would allow the parking of oversized vehicles for four periods of up to 72 consecutive hours per calendar month. This means that people could legally park overnight on the streets for 12 days per month. Permit prices have not yet been determined.

The proposed ordinance applies to oversized vehicles over 20 feet in length and 8 feet in height, reducing the permitted length by five feet.

City officials hope to complement this program with an expanded secure parking program, which is currently run by the Association of Faith Communities. Currently, the AFC offers 15 parking spaces in the city – most of which are at religious sites – as well as 21 spaces outside the city, such as in Aptos.

Reverend Joseph Jacobs, director of AFC’s SafeSpaces program, noted during the meeting that the city had never sponsored the safe parking program. He said the city had previously told him there was no funding available for SafeSpaces, and he questioned where the funding for the program would come from.

Kalantari-Johnson said the city is also in discussions with county partners to identify parking spots in unincorporated areas.


Homelessness issues “often uniquely reveal the divisions in our community,” Kumar said. Most members of the public who spoke at Tuesday’s meeting agreed: they said they viewed the proposed ordinance as inhumane and an attempt by the city to criminalize homelessness.

Speaking with people living in RVs on Delaware Street, Lookout found that some had already paid over $ 1,000 in parking tickets, often getting more than one in a single night. Since January, the police department said it had received 2,456 calls about recreational vehicles or abandoned vehicles. The SCPD issued warnings to 294 recreational vehicles, saying they must move within 72 hours, and towed about 12 of them, the department reported.

RV inhabitant "Eddie" spoke to Lookout along Delaware Street this week.

The resident of the “Eddie” RV spoke to Lookout along Delaware Street this week.

(Kevin Painchaud / Santa Cruz Belvedere)

“Why are they treating us like this? Ron asked. “Have mercy on the homeless. We are also people. We are not drug addicts. We are not criminals. We are just unlucky people.

A representative from Santa Cruz Cares, formerly known as Westside Cares, told council: “You have chosen to tow, ticket and distribute torts to people who are not financially able to comply with this policy. , directly creating more homeless homelessness. “

But many Westside owners have told a different story.

“As a father, it’s hard to hear my kids say they’re afraid to walk down the street,” said Manuel, a representative for Westside Neighbors who did not provide his last name.

In particular, a report from the city and members of the public highlighted sanitation issues, saying residents of RVs were dumping sewage into streets and storm sewers.

The report states, “One of the most common issues raised with prolonged parking of oversized vehicles is the release of raw sewage into city streets and into storm sewers.

Some people living in RVs told Lookout this is a myth, while others admitted that it happens occasionally.

At Tuesday’s meeting, city staff reported that an RV dump site at 1220 River Street is still under review following a 2020 recommendation from the city’s Community Homelessness Advisory Committee. .

One of the most common issues raised with prolonged parking of oversized vehicles is the discharge of raw sewage into city streets and into storm sewers.

– City report

“The current conditions are unsanitary and dangerous and by no means compassionate to anyone,” wrote community member Samantha Petovello.

The city has received around 400 letters both in favor and in opposition to the proposed ordinance, although public participation at Tuesday’s 8 p.m. meeting was disappointing.

Council member Justin Cummings pleaded for allowing the public as much feedback as possible before the council makes decisions.

“I think what we really need to do is show that there is a diverse and inclusive community process that really gives people enough time to weigh in,” he said.

Ultimately, the council voted to allow more time for public comment on the ordinance at its October 26 meeting. He also voted in favor of the mayor’s creation of a subcommittee to work with staff to further explore options for a safe parking program.


Source link

]]>
Council and Crown Corporation Reach Agreement on Park Modernization | Port Lincoln weather https://tvresortmarina.com/council-and-crown-corporation-reach-agreement-on-park-modernization-port-lincoln-weather/ Wed, 22 Sep 2021 03:47:00 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/council-and-crown-corporation-reach-agreement-on-park-modernization-port-lincoln-weather/ The owners of the land where the campervan park is located in Cleve have reached an agreement with the local council to make improvements to the site. Cleve Show Company President Lyndon Crosby at the RV park site which has been upgraded for council construction of the camp kitchen. Image: provided. The Cleve Agricultural, Horticultural […]]]>

The owners of the land where the campervan park is located in Cleve have reached an agreement with the local council to make improvements to the site.

Cleve Show Company President Lyndon Crosby at the RV park site which has been upgraded for council construction of the camp kitchen. Image: provided.

The Cleve Agricultural, Horticultural and Floricultural Society owns the land, and President Lyndon Crosby said they were approached by council in mid-2020 about plans to improve the RV park on the land and potentially move the show to the EP Field Days site.

The Cleve AH&F show company and committee have refused to move the show to the EP Field Days site, but welcome the RV area upgrade.

Mr Crosby said the show needed the infrastructure on its own grounds, which was granted to it over 100 years ago.

“The grounds and facilities are a legacy that has been granted to the Cleve AH & F Society for permanent use, for entertainment purposes,” said Mr. Crosby.

“We take this heritage seriously and could not in good conscience give away this land and the improvements that have been built and maintained by hard working members for many generations.”

He said, however, that the initial proposal to improve the RV park was acceptable and that the council had rented part of the show park land to allow him to apply for grants to build a camp kitchen and make improvements. at the sanitary block.

Cleve Mayor Phil Cameron said the upgrade was happening in two phases, the first of which included leveling the area and building the camp kitchen.

“The second phase, we are waiting for the result of a grant … but the whole project will cost around $ 600,000,” he said.

The second phase will include a new sanitary block, as well as some electrical and plumbing improvements.

“What’s good is that it’s in collaboration with the entertainment company, and obviously we want to attract more people and provide better equipment,” Cameron said.

“They get $ 10 a night so that will help them with their current shows. It’s a win-win because it’s also close to the main shopping district and we can see the added benefits.”

Mr Crosby said the company would retain revenue from the facility using an honesty box system and continue to cover the majority of its operating costs.

He said he was keen to see more promotion of the park to attract visitors to the district.

“The RV Park has received positive reviews from travelers in our city and we are certainly in favor of its future development,” he said.

“We hope to see this as a successful endeavor to promote our city and our businesses. “

Mr Crosby said council has started preliminary leveling work on the leased area, but the RV park is still open to travelers.


Source link

]]>
The Ultimate Guide to Hiking in Yosemite National Park https://tvresortmarina.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-hiking-in-yosemite-national-park/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 15:30:00 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/the-ultimate-guide-to-hiking-in-yosemite-national-park/ Yosemite National Park is home to some of the best and most scenic hiking trails in the country, and this guide helps you navigate them all. Yosemite National Park is a popular destination for outdoor activities like hiking, camping, and rock climbing. Yosemite National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and 95% of the […]]]>

Yosemite National Park is home to some of the best and most scenic hiking trails in the country, and this guide helps you navigate them all.

Yosemite National Park is a popular destination for outdoor activities like hiking, camping, and rock climbing. Yosemite National Park is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and 95% of the park is considered wilderness. It draws crowds from all over the world with its natural beauty and fun activities. In recent years, park management has asked visitors to make reservations before heading to Yosemite to control incoming crowds.

It is located along the Sierra Nevada in northern California and spans up to 1,189 square miles of land. Thousands of lakes, ponds and streams are found in this park. There are over 1,300 km of hiking trails that allow visitors to see views of mountains, glaciers, meadows, granite cliffs and waterfalls.

When to hike

The park is open all year round. Some areas will be closed during the winter and will have severe weather conditions. The best time to hike is between May and September due to the good weather. Most of the trails are closed during the winter months due to snow.

Hiking trails

Yosemite’s hiking trails are very popular, which means they can be extremely crowded all year round. It is best to make reservations and arrangements in advance, especially for those who wish to seek help from guides.

Access

To control the number of visitors, the national park required visitors to make reservations. Ticket prices are as follows:

  • Private vehicles (including pickup, RV, van with up to 15 passenger seats) – $ 35 per vehicle
  • Motorcycle – $ 30 per motorcycle
  • Bike, Horse, Foot, Non-commercial vehicles with 15+ passenger seats – $ 20 per person

RELATED: Horsetail Falls opens this weekend in Yosemite National Park and here’s what you need to know

Public transport

YARTS (Yosemite Area Regional Transportation System) provides year-round service to park visitors.

  • It runs along Highway 41 on a fixed route in Yosemite National Park. YARTS has connections to Greyhound and Amtrak, and Fresno International Airport.
  • Fresno Airport to Yosemite Valley Visitor Center (Roundtrip) – from $ 18

Accommodation

Here are some of the accommodations available in Yosemite National Park:

Ahwahnee

  • Open all year
  • One must reserve
  • Price range: $ 574 per night

Yosemite Valley Lodge

  • Open all year
  • Price range: $ 249

Wawona Hotel

  • Open from June 10, 2021 to November 2021 and March 25, 2022
  • Price range: $ 231

Curry Village

  • Open from April 2 to November 28, 2021 and from December 17, 2021 to January 2, 2022
  • Room categories: standard hotel rooms, wooden cabins, canvas cabins
  • Price range: $ 152

Housekeeping camp

  • April 23, 2021 to October 11, 2021, 50% occupancy
  • Price range: from $ 103.09

Lodge of the White Wolf

  • Closed for summer 2021
  • Room categories: tent cabins and wooden cabins
  • Price range: from $ 137

Tuolumne Meadows Lodge

  • Closed for summer 2021
  • Room categories: canvas cabins for up to 4 people
  • No electricity, no TV, shared toilets
  • Price range: from $ 137

High Sierra camps

  • Price range: $ 706.50 per person for a 5 night stay

Motorhomes and Campgrounds

  • Available on a first come, first served basis
  • Price range: $ 14

Weather

Yosemite National Park has a Mediterranean climate. It is almost dry most of the year, with some precipitation during the winter.

RELATED: How to Spend an Entire Weekend in Montana Glacier National Park

Preparing for a hike

Yosemite has over 1,300 km of hiking trails. There are a variety of trails, and they range from easy to difficult. There are different ways to go hiking. To prepare, be sure to bring water, snacks, a hat, and sunglasses. Here are the options:

Personalized guided hikes

  • 4 hours – from $ 70 per person for a group of 4
  • 8 hours – from $ 90 per person for a group of 4
  • 10 hours – from $ 150 per person for a group of 4
  • Easy to moderate trail with a guide
  • Plus, a private guide will design a hike to suit your skill level and preferences.

Guided group hikes

  • June to early October
  • Minimum age: 12 years old
  • Adventure hike: $ 85 per person, 8 hours (Sunday and Friday)
  • Track: Tenaya Canyon, Mirror Lake, option to explore Snow Creek Trail
  • One day adventure hike: $ 85 per person, 6 hours (Tuesdays)
  • Track: from Curry Village, Happy Isles, Vernal and Nevada Falls

Guided half-dome hikes

  • 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
  • A permit is required

Guided hikes in High Sierra Camp

  • Possibility of 5 and 7 day hikes
  • Hikers are chosen by a lottery system
  • Hikers can stay at High Sierra Camps

Self-guided hikes

  • Hikes pass through Yosemite Valley, Glacier Point Road, Hetch Hetchy, White Wolf, Tuolumne Meadows, Wawona, and Mariposa Grove of Giant Sequoias

Trail 1: leading to the top of the half-dome

  • End of May to October
  • This is the most popular and coveted trail. It requires a permit to be reserved in advance because the park only allows 300 hikers.
  • Difficulty: Arduous
  • Duration: 10-14 hours

Trail 2: Merced Grove Trail

  • Hikers descend an old road to Merced Grove, one of Yosemite’s redwood groves.
  • Difficulty: Moderate
  • Duration: 1-3 hours

Trail 3: Nevada Fall Trail

  • From Mist Trail, continue for 1.3 km, then enter Nevada Fall. Hikers can access Nevada Falls via the John Muir Trail.
  • Difficulty: Arduous
  • Duration: 5-6 hours

Summer activities

Rafting

  • Paddle the Merced River with friends for an adrenaline rush!
  • Cost: from $ 28.50 per person, minimum of 2 paddlers

Cycling

  • Yosemite Valley is flat which makes for easy driving even for beginners. Bikers should stay in cycle lanes only.
  • Bike rental cost: from $ 30 for 5 hours (standard bike)

Escalation

  • Recommended during months without snow. Yosemite National Park has licensed rock climbing instructors with First Responder and EMT certifications to assist climbers.
  • Reservations are recommended, as this is one of Yosemite’s most popular activities.
  • Cost of the guided ascent: from $ 195 (group of 3), 6 hours

Horse and mule ride

  • Available from May to September
  • Cost: $ 70 per person
  • Duration: 2 hours
  • Reservations through the Wawona stable are required
  • Walk all day: $ 144.00 per person, minimum age required: 10 years old

Yosemite National Park comes highly recommended for those who love the great outdoors. The views and scenery are so breathtaking that even the most strenuous hikes are worth it.

FOLLOWING: Here’s how you can see the best of Hawaii’s Volcanoes National Park

the walk of the sky of kinzau in the forest of allegheny in the autumn

This Allegheny Forest day trip is best for leaf viewing and panoramic mountain views



Source link

]]>
San Francisco embraces first tiny homeless cabin village with plans for SoMa https://tvresortmarina.com/san-francisco-embraces-first-tiny-homeless-cabin-village-with-plans-for-soma/ Tue, 21 Sep 2021 01:27:30 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/san-francisco-embraces-first-tiny-homeless-cabin-village-with-plans-for-soma/ After years of resistance, San Francisco is finally embarking on the mini-house technique to shelter the homeless with the intention of installing them in two parking lots between Market and Mission streets, The Chronicle has learned. The lots at 33 Gough St. have been in use since December as a city-sanctioned “safe sleep village”, housing […]]]>

After years of resistance, San Francisco is finally embarking on the mini-house technique to shelter the homeless with the intention of installing them in two parking lots between Market and Mission streets, The Chronicle has learned.

The lots at 33 Gough St. have been in use since December as a city-sanctioned “safe sleep village”, housing 44 tents for homeless people while they receive guidance on how to get them to permanent homes. These tents will be replaced in late fall with 70 mini-homes, dubbed cabins, similar to those already in use for years in Oakland, the Peninsula and San Jose.

Each 64 square foot cabin will have a steel frame, 2 inch thick walls, heating systems, desk, bed and window. The site will benefit from improved bathrooms, storage space and a dining room.

The $ 1.7 million cost of building and installing the cabins, as well as the dining room and other facilities, will be paid for by money raised by nonprofits DignityMoves and Tipping. Point Community. The cabins will remain in place for 18 months, when the lease signed by the city for the use of the parking lots as outdoor shelter spaces runs out.

The cabins are only a pilot program, and this test is just the latest in a series of new techniques the city has tried in light of the growing homeless population during the coronavirus pandemic. With new tax and federal funding that will bring funding for the homeless in San Francisco to around $ 800 million for each of the next two years, programs and policy makers plan to buy more properties for the homeless. shelter, place people in vacant apartments in the city and open a secure camper site for 150 vehicles.

“So many homeless people don’t want to go to collective shelters, and tents have been a good alternative to the outdoors, but these huts are a big next step,” said Elizabeth Funk, founder and director of DignityMoves, who is the developer of the cabin site. “When you have your own bedroom and a door that locks, it makes a big difference.

These cabins will be installed at 33 Gough Street in San Francisco, replacing the current tent village for the homeless.

| SFC Column / Courtesy of Dignity Moves

“I believe when you give someone that kind of dignity that you can get with your own bedroom and a lockable door, you close them for more success,” Funk said.

Several of those now living in the tents at 33 Gough Street said they were excited to swap their fabric walls for solid ones. Everyone will be offered a place in the cabin community when it opens, officials said.

“Coming home to something that really looks like a house would be so great,” said Benjamin Longmore, 36, who has been at the Safe Sleep Village since it opened and is studying to become a poverty counselor. “A door you can lock, a little warmth so you don’t get cold at night – I’d love that.”

“I’m really trying to take the next step in my life and need all the help I can get. “

A few tents away, Jacqueline Smith, 29, said she was still recovering from the trauma of living on the streets for several years before moving to the Safe Sleep Village a month ago.

“I have never felt safe outside, and this place is a big improvement over the street, but I would really like to have a real door and window that I could look through without being exposed,” said she declared. “Having a place with walls would make you feel more like going back to normal, which I want so badly. “

Like many in the village, she said she agreed to move into the tent site after being intermittently homeless for 10 years because “it felt a lot safer than a typical indoor shelter, especially during a pandemic where you get sick from being so close to so many other people.

Oakland has served more than 600 people with similar cottage settlements since 2017, and city officials say about half have moved to more permanent accommodation after stabilizing. The cities of San Jose and Mountain View, in partnership with several agencies and associations, have created more than 640 housing units of this type over the past two years, also used as transitional housing.

San Francsico has always been reluctant to set up tiny houses rather than assembly shelters due to the severe shortage of open and unused space in the city. But the pandemic forced authorities to be more flexible, and sheltering people in outdoor tents was safer than placing them in confined indoor assembly shelters.

The city now operates five of these sites, containing 220 tents and dubbed “Safe Sleep Villages”. Officials have been criticized for the relatively high cost of each site, $ 61,000 per year per tent, and said they have looked at that cost to reduce it.



Source link

]]>