Rv Site – TV Resort Marina http://tvresortmarina.com/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 00:49:44 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 https://tvresortmarina.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-4.png Rv Site – TV Resort Marina http://tvresortmarina.com/ 32 32 Shady Rest Campground Ends RV Resident Leases https://tvresortmarina.com/shady-rest-campground-ends-rv-resident-leases/ Fri, 21 Jan 2022 00:43:21 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/shady-rest-campground-ends-rv-resident-leases/ IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (KIFI) – Shady Rest Campgrounds is forcing most of its residents to relocate to another RV park. Every RV resident received a letter regarding the notice of termination on January 10. That letter asked residents to “voluntarily leave” by Feb. 28 or Feb. 28. If residents did not comply, they would face […]]]>

IDAHO FALLS, Idaho (KIFI) – Shady Rest Campgrounds is forcing most of its residents to relocate to another RV park.

Every RV resident received a letter regarding the notice of termination on January 10. That letter asked residents to “voluntarily leave” by Feb. 28 or Feb. 28. If residents did not comply, they would face eviction.

The management of Shady Rest is brand new after its acquisition two or three months ago. This new group called Widmyer Corporation now wants to clean up the place and fix many ongoing plumbing and sewer issues. Many residents recognize and hope that these issues will be resolved.

The problem here is that many of these residents have nowhere to go. Some do not have enough income to find another place to live. A resident told us that most people will have to leave their RVs altogether, as many of them are too old to qualify to live in other RV parks. The icy roads will also be a challenge for anyone leaving the place.

A few have plans in place to move, but fear others in the park have nowhere to go and could soon become homeless.

“I will try to move mine to a park in Rigby,” said resident Kevin Clapp. “I don’t know to what extent it’s going to kind of fall apart. There are people here like this lady who was down three or four in the motorhome. I don’t think this motorhome will move one day.”

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The Day – Preston should say no to Pequots plan for RV park on Avery Pond https://tvresortmarina.com/the-day-preston-should-say-no-to-pequots-plan-for-rv-park-on-avery-pond/ Wed, 19 Jan 2022 00:09:07 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/the-day-preston-should-say-no-to-pequots-plan-for-rv-park-on-avery-pond/ I was recently brought to Preston by state poet laureate Margaret Gibson who hoped I would help tell the story of how a motorhome park project not too far from her home is a colossal mistake in the making. I must report that it didn’t take the instinct, observation and language of a good poet […]]]>

I was recently brought to Preston by state poet laureate Margaret Gibson who hoped I would help tell the story of how a motorhome park project not too far from her home is a colossal mistake in the making.

I must report that it didn’t take the instinct, observation and language of a good poet to explain why the Mashantucket Pequots’ plan for the RV park on Route 2 from their Foxwoods Resort Casino is a bad idea for Preston.

Indeed, the project file at the town hall is full of letters from residents, the superintendent of the municipal school as well as the office of the Resident State Trooper, raising objections or simply questions about traffic, noise, lighting and a substantial environmental impact on a site surrounded by fragile wetlands.

It turns out Gibson’s is a small voice in a city chorus of opposition, including many residents of a neighborhood immediately adjacent to the project, who see their beloved Avery Pond, with its rugged wildlife that includes ducks, blue herons, osprey, even eagles, at risk of gross commercialization, 304-space RV parking lot.

City officials were anticipating heavy public turnout for a continuing hearing Tuesday night by the Inland Wetlands Commission. The Planning and Zoning Commission is planning a hearing on January 25.

My first impression when I heard about the project was that it would be, finally, a taxable commercial development related to the casino, which could benefit the city. Indeed, it is located partly in a purpose-built commercial resort development area.

But the RV park, which the tribe is planning with national partner Blue Water Development, which has a number of hotels, resorts and campgrounds in its portfolio, is not the kind of spin-off development the town deserves, after all the years it has hosted the impact of the massive casino development on the tribal reservation just above the town limit.

The proposed development, which includes glamping tent sites and recreational facilities, such as a swimming pool, volleyball and tennis courts, is essentially a huge parking lot for hundreds of motorhomes.

The ancillary buildings, a visitor center and a few public baths, are simple and architecturally undistinguished. The developer will pay relatively little tax on a project that includes modest construction and lots of parking.

It’s not that the tribe is proposing to build a high-taxed, high-end Four Seasons resort there.

This is the most basic form of accommodation and, as it is largely an outdoor sprawl, its impact on the surrounding neighborhood – noise, light and music – will be outsized.

And yet its size, with an estimated daily attendance of 1,000 visitors, will have a huge impact on city services, including traffic and police calls.

In all of the documents submitted by the developer, I did not see any breakdown of costs, comparing what the city will pay for services for the development versus what it will be able to collect in increased taxes.

The inequity of the tribe pledging a budget accommodation project on the city, unlike the luxury hotels they are building on their duty-free reservation, may not be a good legal reason for the councils municipalities reject it.

But there are many other reasons why the wetlands and planning and zoning commissions should say no, starting with the significant negative impacts on the fragile wetland ecosystem around the pond.

Neighbors in the adjacent neighborhood, who are said to be in the klieg lights of an oversized development squeezed into the site of the small pond, made the environmental objections well put.

The best argument for the Planning and Zoning Commission to reject a special zoning exception for the RV park is the requirement that the aesthetic character of the development be in harmony with the surrounding areas and not degrade or diminish not the value of the surrounding neighborhoods.

This overworked and sprawling proposed parking lot with large passing motorhomes and hundreds of visitors coming and going each day would undoubtedly ruin the character of the surrounding modest residential area and its property values.

The project is so large and impactful that it has already taxed the town’s planning department. But Preston appears to have risen to the challenge and is granting the plaintiff and residents a fair and respectful hearing, despite the difficult timing of the claim, just before the holidays and a surge of COVID-19.

There seems to be an obvious conclusion to be drawn when this hearing process is over.

This is the opinion of David Collins.

d.collins@theday.com

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Maggie pauses some developments | News https://tvresortmarina.com/maggie-pauses-some-developments-news/ Mon, 17 Jan 2022 02:13:00 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/maggie-pauses-some-developments-news/ MAGGIE VALLEY — A crowd of around 50 people were in attendance Tuesday for a public hearing to impose a six-month moratorium on the location of planned campgrounds, RV parks and RV unit developments within the city’s zoning jurisdiction. Despite the number of people present, few spoke at the public hearing, after which council approved […]]]>

MAGGIE VALLEY — A crowd of around 50 people were in attendance Tuesday for a public hearing to impose a six-month moratorium on the location of planned campgrounds, RV parks and RV unit developments within the city’s zoning jurisdiction.

Despite the number of people present, few spoke at the public hearing, after which council approved the moratorium on a 3-2 vote with Mayor Mike Eveland, Alderman Jim Owens and Alderman John Hinton approving. and Phillip and Tammy Wight opposing it.

Allen Allsbrooks, a member of the Maggie Valley Zoning Board of Adjustment, read two letters on behalf of others who were unable to attend the meeting – one from former city council member and real estate agent Linda Taylor, who feared that the moratorium would hinder a sale of property, and one from John and Carrie Dazugas, who were concerned about the devaluation action on their property.

Kay Sebastian spoke out in favor of the moratorium, saying that in the November 2021 election, 70% of voters backed candidates who supported responsible growth.

“For those who are unclear on the definition of a moratorium, it is a temporary suspension, and I emphasize the temporary suspension of activity until new conditions justify the lifting of the restrictions. suspensions,” she said.

The essence of government is to balance the needs of a community, and to achieve this, she urged council members to support the moratorium.

William Clark, an attorney representing Ghost Town managing partner Frankie Wood and his company Coastal Development Carolina, said the moratorium would stifle economic development, especially with a number of projects Woods had underway.

“Maggie Valley is a tourist town,” he said. “People come to RV parks. They may not be full time residents, but they will pay taxes, spend money on a unit development project.

A planned RV unit development is a park where each parking area is sold rather than leased.

“Mr. Wood thinks this is aimed at his development,” Clark said, “and asks that the moratorium not pass.”

Clark questioned the difference between the draft version of the moratorium, which he said was clearly illegal, and the final version. He asked the board to allow more time for public comment given the change.

Maggie Valley attorney Craig Justus said the notice of public hearing was for a moratorium and there was no need to provide the specific language of the order before the public hearing.

Dave Angel, the owner of Elevated Mountain Distilling, cited the increase in RV sales, especially since COVID, and predicted the RV trend won’t change.

“It’s an economic growth opportunity for this city,” he said. “The moratorium has a direct impact on the business world and is an opportunity to seize the changing tourism industry.”

Mitch Robinson said he had never been to a growing city lined with campgrounds and RV parks.

“To me, allowing that would block any future growth that matters in the long term. I’m in favor of the moratorium until we figure out what’s best in the long term,” he said.

Ken Brown cited an article in The mountaineer showing that the number of tourists has been steadily increasing for years, and especially in the past year.

“There’s been an exponential spike, and there’s no end in sight,” he said. “Tourism is not out of whack.”

After the public hearing ended, Alderman Phillip Wight opposed the moratorium, saying there were many ways to control development without resorting to a moratorium.

“I don’t understand the fear of RV parks. They are compatible with social isolation and their popularity continues to grow,” Wight said. “Many campsites are already reserved for next year. It’s a huge market.

Alderman Tammy Wight said Haywood has had a banner year in tourism and trying to change zoning rules that ignore one market segment is a “gross abuse of power”.

“Expecting owners and investors to put projects on hold is not always without legal risk,” she warned. “I don’t see it as a matter of need. I see it as a landowner’s right being taken away.

Phillip Wight said Maggie Valley was dying.

“Our business is doing badly and we are doing nothing. We keep going down,” he said. “The idea of ​​hiding in the winter and doing nothing to try to help…I think we’re on the wrong track.”

Alderman John Hinton said 12 RV parks over four miles was too much.

“It’s not about property rights. It’s about what people want their city to look like,” he said. “This is a short period of reflection while we objectively review the ordinances. We need to put the UDO (Unified Development Ordinance) in place.

Mayor Mike Eveland said the moratorium would allow time for the UDO to be considered and explained that passing it would remove politics and emotion from the process.

Alderman Jim Owens said a dozen campgrounds and RV parks in the city was more than enough, and cited public sentiment he encountered on the campaign trail along these lines. . He cited a survey by the Maggie Valley Chamber of Commerce where even business owners weren’t keen on the idea of ​​high-end campgrounds or RV parks.

Of 167 survey respondents, three-quarters said there were enough campgrounds in town, and more than half said they would not prefer luxury campgrounds to campgrounds that allow all types of vehicles.

Owens introduced a motion to approve the moratorium, which passed by a 3-2 vote.

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Woodland Park homeless encampment is Harrell’s first target, but shelter issues may thwart him https://tvresortmarina.com/woodland-park-homeless-encampment-is-harrells-first-target-but-shelter-issues-may-thwart-him/ Sat, 15 Jan 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/woodland-park-homeless-encampment-is-harrells-first-target-but-shelter-issues-may-thwart-him/ Wanda Williams and Troy Repp have lived in Woodland Park for over three years. It’s like home; they have a mailbox in an old tree and a makeshift shack with a drive-thru doorknob. But the couple is ready to leave. The camp has grown since the pandemic hit, they say they hear gunshots every night […]]]>

Wanda Williams and Troy Repp have lived in Woodland Park for over three years. It’s like home; they have a mailbox in an old tree and a makeshift shack with a drive-thru doorknob.

But the couple is ready to leave. The camp has grown since the pandemic hit, they say they hear gunshots every night and one of them must always be there or they will get robbed.

“Some people are sincerely here because we’re going through a tough time, but a lot of these kids are on drugs. And they’re struggling,” Williams said.

For years, a constellation of camps and RVs has sprawled through the trees of Woodland Park. Mayor Bruce Harrell, who pinned his election on what he called compassionate but urgent action on encampments, unveiled his platform for the homeless last year just a few blocks away.

As he begins his term, this is the first major encampment in his sights – a “top focus”, according to a Harrell spokesperson.

The Seattle Times Homeless Project is funded by BECU, the Bernier McCaw Foundation, the Campion Foundation, the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, the Raikes Foundation, the Seattle Foundation, Starbucks, and the University of Washington. The Seattle Times maintains editorial control over the content of Project Homeless.

But where the estimated 80 people living in the park will go is not so clear, as hotel shelters due to the pandemic begin to close and nonprofits struggle to staff the shelters they have. already.

Harrell has paired his pledge for a more aggressive encampment approach with the pledge to open new shelter beds, but he’s looking at a shelter system that may not be able to grow enough to accommodate everyone in the city’s encampments as his objective extends beyond Woodland Park.

There’s a new shelter in Queen Anne slated to open later this month that will add 41 beds, and more are on the way with local and federal dollars. At the same time, city-leased hotel shelters at the King’s Inn and the Executive Hotel Pacific will close this month.

“I really don’t believe we have enough spaces to do the Lower Woodland [removal] and resolve to determine hotels. Because I think that has to be our first priority,” said councilman Andrew Lewis, who chairs the city’s homeless committee.

Seattle City Council member Dan Strauss, who represents the district that includes Woodland Park, said he was working with the mayor and other local partners to bring homeless people to shelters. Like at the recently cleaned up Ballard Commons and Bitter Lake, Strauss wants the pullout to take as long as it takes to get everyone who wants to go inside.

“Because Woodland Park is so big, we’re going to have to do it section by section to be successful,” Strauss said. “We can’t wait until there are enough beds for everyone in the park to move them all at once.”

Regional Homelessness Authority CEO Marc Dones told Harrell and other regional leaders on Thursday that finding and acquiring new sites for shelters isn’t the problem — it’s the people to staff them. As the new year dawns, the nonprofits that run shelters in the city are under such strain that they’re struggling to staff existing facilities, Dones said.

Nonprofit shelters, which tend to pay low wages to their frontline staff, have been hit hard by the coronavirus and subsequent labor shortages in the past year, and many were unable to fill vacancies. The Seattle City Council included millions for cost-of-living increases and bonuses for these workers in this year’s budget, but even those who celebrated the increase admitted it was a band-aid approach for decades of underfunding.

Inclement weather in December and the Omicron variant of the coronavirus caused “massive bleeding” in the shelter sector, Dones said.

“Our front line staff cannot maintain the salary they are at – that is not possible,” Dones said. “We run shelters with one person per shift, which is not good.”

The Regional Homeless Authority resumed operation of city and county homeless shelters on Jan. 1, and Harrell and other regional leaders approved the authority’s first budget on Thursday.

In an email, a spokesperson for Harrell left open the possibility of a slow approach seen at many encampments over the past year. Several high-profile camp relocations, including one to nearby Greenlake, could give the new mayor time to deliver on his campaign promises.

According to Paul Kostek, who has lived in Greenlake for 25 years and chairs the Greenlake Community Council, there has always been a small group of people, many of them older, who have camped under the old trees to get away from the town center. . But since the pandemic hit, the encampment has grown, as have complaints from nearby residents when occasional fires break out. Last year, they peaked when cross-country running clubs canceled events at the park.

“There was a feeling of, why can’t we do something? Why is nothing done? said Kostek.

But as other North Seattle camps were evacuated in the past year, people felt a change was coming and now it feels like there’s more of a consensus at City Hall. “Maybe that’s exactly what we needed is to set the tone at City Hall and get the Mayor and City Council working again.”

The large number of people at Woodland Park “creates a serious and unique challenge,” a Harrell spokesperson said.

Lewis and Harrell are considering trying to open another tiny house village for Woodland Park campers, but the tiny house strategy has been pushed back by the regional authority and some advocates who feel people are staying too long in the camps. villages without enough support.

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Season review: Air Force ends season 10-3 overall https://tvresortmarina.com/season-review-air-force-ends-season-10-3-overall/ Thu, 13 Jan 2022 22:58:47 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/season-review-air-force-ends-season-10-3-overall/ Photo by Trevor Cokley Soccer 01/13/2022 15:53:00 Falcons MW Mountain Division co-champions with a 6-2 mark History links Air Force Football Final Release 2021 OVERVIEW Air Force finished the season 10-3 overall and was co-champion in the Mountain West Mountain Division with a 6-2 mark. The Falcons posted double-digit wins for the second time in […]]]>

Photo by Trevor Cokley

Soccer

Falcons MW Mountain Division co-champions with a 6-2 mark

2021 OVERVIEW

Air Force finished the season 10-3 overall and was co-champion in the Mountain West Mountain Division with a 6-2 mark. The Falcons posted double-digit wins for the second time in three seasons (2019), fourth time under head coach Troy Calhoun and ninth time in school history. The Air Force closed the season with a 31-28 victory over Louisville in the First Responder Bowl in Dallas, Texas, to record its third straight win since 2016, including two straight Power 5 teams. The team was 6-1 away from home that season, which tied a program record for away/neutral site wins that was first set in 1958. Air Force won the national running title for the second straight season and third time overall in program history averaging 327.7 per game. The Falcons were the only team in the country to average over 300 yards. The offensive line, nicknamed the Diesel, powered the rushing offense and became the first Group of 5 team to be a finalist for the Joe Moore Award as the nation’s best offensive line. The Falcons have had four players earn All-Mountain West honors, as a junior fullback Brad Robert and senior offensive lineman Falcon Wimmer earned first-team honors while a senior defensive lineman Jordan Jackson and junior outside linebacker Vince Sanford were named to the second team.

SEASONAL NOTES

• Air Force played their 28th bowl game overall and 11th as a head coach Troy Calhounthe 15 seasons. The Air Force improved to 14-13-1 all-time in bowls, including a 6-5 mark under Calhoun. The Falcons have won three straight games, including two straight Power 5 teams.
• The Air Force finished the season receiving votes in both national polls. The Falcons were 34th in the Associated Press poll with one point and 28th in the USA Today AFCA Coaches poll with 42 points.
• Air Force has improved to 7-12 against Power Five teams since 2003. The Falcons are 0-2 at home and 7-10 on the road/neutral. Air Force is 5-9 under head coach Troy Calhoun. The Falcons have won three straight against Power 5 teams, beating Colorado and Washington State in 2019 and Louisville this season.

TEAM INFORMATION
Current winning streak: W4
Rankings (AP/Coaches): VR/VR
Last match: W 31-28 against Louisville (First Responder Bowl, Dallas, TX)

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The luxury motorhome fleet was not ‘luxury’ – Canon City Daily Record https://tvresortmarina.com/the-luxury-motorhome-fleet-was-not-luxury-canon-city-daily-record/ Wed, 12 Jan 2022 00:15:58 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/the-luxury-motorhome-fleet-was-not-luxury-canon-city-daily-record/ Until now, what was promised as a one-off luxury RV park on Phantom Canyon Road has not been viewed as luxurious by county officials. The Fremont County Council of Commissioners on Tuesday filed a decision to consider a major amendment to an existing special examination use permit held by Phantom Canyon RV Ranch, located at […]]]>

Until now, what was promised as a one-off luxury RV park on Phantom Canyon Road has not been viewed as luxurious by county officials.

The Fremont County Council of Commissioners on Tuesday filed a decision to consider a major amendment to an existing special examination use permit held by Phantom Canyon RV Ranch, located at 505 County Road 67 in Penrose.

The board heard reports from the Fremont County Planning and Zoning Director and Fremont County Building Manager, both of whom expressed concern over homeowners’ non-compliance with their existing SRUs. .

The major modification provides for the addition of 20 additional autonomous travel trailers, the modification of operational characteristics, the installation of an on-site wastewater treatment system, the reduction of the recreation area and the addition of 23 476 square feet of storage space and structures.

Claimants’ representative Dr Angela Bellantoni said the project was first approved unanimously on March 10, 2020, but former planning director Sean Garrett told homeowners in April 2021 to stop all work until they have an approved site plan. That meant they couldn’t apply for a building permit for a public bath, which they had until March 2022 to complete.

The council held a public hearing on April 27, 2021 for its special consideration after violations were reported in the park and was prepared to revoke the SRU because of those violations.

The three violations alleged at the time included putting in place structures that were not approved or indicated on the site plan, operating the SRU without meeting the conditions for approval because the drainage systems were not not installed and garbage, waste and debris placed on site.

Garrett said all violations were corrected the day before that meeting and the company was operating in compliance at that time.

Planning director Mica Simpleman said recent inspections revealed a number of violations, including wrecked and unregistered vehicles on the property, a commercial truck parked in a space that apparently served as a contractor yard , a hose and a transfer tank next to the dump station. , the non-potable tank had collapsed, a mattress was placed under a motorhome, another motorhome did not have its sewer pipes clogged, there was only one dumpster for all the lots , campers had trash around them, there were seven dogs on the property, three different lots had what appeared to be permanent dog enclosures, and one camper had an eviction notice on the gate.

The most recent inspection took place on Monday.

“At that time there were many campers who had been there for over 90 days, this was confirmed by past and current photos,” Simpleman said. “Two campers had items stored under the campers and one had garbage piled up to complete a standard refrigerator. The dump station is surrounded by pipes and the tank was still collapsed. “

Neighboring owner Paul Bond, who also spoke at the Meeting of March 10, 2020, said the majority of RVs have been there for several months and instead of seeing ‘luxury’ and high end RVs he only sees black water and human waste collected camping by camping -car in a small tote, drugs behind a vehicle and thrown into an earthen vault.

“Phantom Canyon RV Park has exceeded its sewage disposal capacity and can now become a state problem,” he said.

“We were originally told this would be a luxury RV park, but we’ve seen photos of the tours over time – there’s nothing I would say luxurious,” said Commission President Debbie Bell. “We were also guaranteed that you would only focus on autonomous RVs – only vehicles 10 years of age or older would be allowed, except in the case of certain rebuilds. “

She said photos show many recreational vehicles are over 10 years old, and in some cases even 30 years old.

She asked co-owner Mitch Slatin to explain why the park doesn’t comply with so many things.

“I am not allowed to take a gun and put it on someone’s head and force them to act – it’s not something that is legal to do – I have procedures what I need to do – eviction proceedings, ”Slatin said. “It’s the best I can do under the law.”

He said the person who had the refrigerator was supposed to be kicked out but ended up going to jail on drug charges. The owners make every effort to have their affairs legally removed from the property.

“We are constantly watched,” Slatin said. “If we were doing something bad or bad, you would have heard about it way before now. “

He said a lot of people have been kicked out and the park is pretty empty.

“We can’t wait to finally be able to move forward and finally be able to build a park,” he said. “That’s the problem – we weren’t allowed to build the park. You allowed us to open on March 10, 2020, but after that, every time we took a step to build the park, we were told to stop. For two years we were told to do nothing. Let’s build a park. Let us build it right, and we’ll give you the product we promised.

The council is expected to render a decision on February 8.

Also during the meeting, the board of directors:

  • Named Bell as chair of the board for 2022 and commissioner Kevin Grantham as interim chair.
  • Approved a special examination use permit for Echoland for eight glamping structures and one 16.16 acre rental home located at 45120 WUS 50.
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Rohingya refugees: fire destroys hundreds of homes in refugee camp in Bangladesh https://tvresortmarina.com/rohingya-refugees-fire-destroys-hundreds-of-homes-in-refugee-camp-in-bangladesh/ Mon, 10 Jan 2022 03:38:00 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/rohingya-refugees-fire-destroys-hundreds-of-homes-in-refugee-camp-in-bangladesh/ The fire affected Camp 16 in Cox’s Bazar, a border district where more than one million Rohingya refugees live, most of whom fled army crackdown in Myanmar in 2017. Mohammed Shamsud Douza, a Bangladesh government refugee official, said rescuers contained the blaze. The cause of the fire has not been established, he added. “It’s all […]]]>
The fire affected Camp 16 in Cox’s Bazar, a border district where more than one million Rohingya refugees live, most of whom fled army crackdown in Myanmar in 2017.

Mohammed Shamsud Douza, a Bangladesh government refugee official, said rescuers contained the blaze. The cause of the fire has not been established, he added.

“It’s all gone. Many are homeless, ”said Abu Taher, a Rohingya refugee.

Last Sunday, another fire ravaged a Covid-19 refugee treatment center in another refugee camp in the district, leaving no victims.

A devastating fire in March swept through the world’s largest refugee camp in Cox’s Bazar, killing at least 15 refugees and torching more than 10,000 slums.

Estimates of the number of Rohingya refugees living in Cox’s Bazar range from 800,000 to over 900,000, according to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees and Save the Children.

Most of the refugees have fled persecution in neighboring Myanmar.

In 2016 and 2017, the Burmese military launched a brutal campaign of murder and arson that forced more than 740,000 people from the Rohingya minority to flee to neighboring Bangladesh, prompting a hearing of genocide before the International Court of Justice. In 2019, the United Nations said “serious human rights violations” by the military continued in the ethnic states of Rakhine, Chin, Shan, Kachin and Karen.

Myanmar denies genocide accusations and maintains that military “mine clearance operations” were legitimate counterterrorism measures.


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BTS’s V and Park Seo Joon camp out on Choi Woo Sik’s Instagram update https://tvresortmarina.com/btss-v-and-park-seo-joon-camp-out-on-choi-woo-siks-instagram-update/ Sat, 08 Jan 2022 11:19:12 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/btss-v-and-park-seo-joon-camp-out-on-choi-woo-siks-instagram-update/ the Wooga Team went wild on Instagram! Their interactions made us laugh on the floor and marvel at the close bond they seem to share with each other. Comprised of actors Choi Woo Sik, Park Seo Joon, Park Hyung Sik, singer and actor BTS ‘V as well as musician Peakboy, Wooga Squad has become the […]]]>

the Wooga Team went wild on Instagram! Their interactions made us laugh on the floor and marvel at the close bond they seem to share with each other. Comprised of actors Choi Woo Sik, Park Seo Joon, Park Hyung Sik, singer and actor BTS ‘V as well as musician Peakboy, Wooga Squad has become the most popular collection of some of the most dynamic individuals in the entertainment industry. Korean.

On January 7, actors Choi Woo Sik, Park Seo Joon and singer-actor BTS ‘V had fun in the comments section of an Instagram post from the “Our Beloved Summer” actor. Sharing a behind-the-scenes image of himself, Choi Woo Sik demanded Monday to arrive faster as it’s the day his drama with Kim Da Mi airs on SBS and Netflix.

V from BTS mocked Choi Woo Sik’s expression, saying “Expression, wow ha ha ha”, where he can be seen lashing out at the busy team. At this, the ‘Parasite’ actor lovingly asked her not to love her too much. Soon actor Park Seo Joon also commented on his admiration for Choi Woo Sik saying, “You know how to be cute” and the answer came with a simple smiley, “:)”

Check out the fun interactions below.

‘Our Beloved Summer’ is the story of 2 high school sweethearts dating. They are reunited by fate as their documentary goes viral. It stars Choi Woo Sik as Choi Ung and Kim Da Mi as Kook Yeonsu. It airs every Monday and Tuesday at 10 p.m. KST (7:30 p.m. IST). The drama also has an OST, ‘Christmas Tree’, sung by BTS ‘V.

Join “The K-world Celebration” with “The HallyuTalk Awards” here.

ALSO READ: BTS’s V and Our Beloved Summer’s Choi Woo Sik Are Trendy Best Friends In New Instagram Update; PEAK



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Dangerous Falling Branches Cause Camper Complaints at Warrnambool Trailer Park | The standard https://tvresortmarina.com/dangerous-falling-branches-cause-camper-complaints-at-warrnambool-trailer-park-the-standard/ Thu, 06 Jan 2022 05:30:00 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/dangerous-falling-branches-cause-camper-complaints-at-warrnambool-trailer-park-the-standard/ news, latest news, Campers at Warrnambool’s Surfside Holiday Park have complained about a dangerous tree causing large branches to fall, potentially putting campers at risk. The campers, who did not wish to be named, were staying near the great Norfolk pine on January 1 when one of the upper branches snapped and fell halfway down […]]]>

news, latest news,

Campers at Warrnambool’s Surfside Holiday Park have complained about a dangerous tree causing large branches to fall, potentially putting campers at risk. The campers, who did not wish to be named, were staying near the great Norfolk pine on January 1 when one of the upper branches snapped and fell halfway down the tree. Management was alerted to the incident, but no action was taken. A spokesperson for Warrnambool City Council, which manages the trailer park, said park management was “unable to confirm” that there was a loose branch at the time, and therefore no action was not taken. But one camper said the branch was clearly discernible. In the early hours of the next morning, January 2, five or six more large branches broke and fell through the tree. Fortunately, there were no people or vehicles under the tree at the time. Later in the morning of January 2, park management cordoned off the area using witch hats. “An arborist was present that day,” said the council spokesperson. “Their advice was that the loss of branches was likely due to recent dampness and that no immediate corrective action was required for the tree.” The board said management had offered campers relocation to other sites and even refunds. The arborist returned to the site on January 5 to clear the broken branches and test the safety of the remaining branches. Campers also complained that the caravan park, which has more than 1,000 pitches, does not have any facilities for caravans to dispose of their gray water. IN OTHER NEWS: Modern caravans generally have shower facilities, clothes and dishwashers, producing hundreds of gallons of gray water, which has led many caravan parks to install ‘drop-off points’. draining ”dedicated in recent years. The caravan parks managed by the Warrnambool City Council have not set up such sites despite their considerable size. A spokesperson for the council said there was “the possibility that a dedicated infrastructure will be put in place for gray water in the future, however, at this time if you choose to generate gray water it is up to you to manage and dispose of them appropriately. it has no impact on your fellow campers. “At least one group of campers had resorted to digging a hole in their campsite to remove gray water, creating a potential hazard. The spokesperson said Surfside had its own showers, laundry room and kitchen, suggesting that if campers were concerned about producing excess gray water, they could use the park’s facilities. More than 100 campsites have been vacated in recent days as campers have decided to cut short their stays to avoid a growing outbreak of COVID-19 at council’s trailer parks.There were 121 requests for reimbursement out of a total of about 2,400 bookings, the majority of which were from campers who decided to leave earlier than planned. Now just a tap on our new app: digital subscribers now have the ability to receive information faster, at their fingertips with The Standard: our journalists work ent hard to provide local and up-to-date information to the community. Here’s how you can access our trusted content:

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Campground Owned by For-Profit LLC and Used by Boy Scouts of America Qualifies for 100% Property Tax Exemption in Indiana | Faegre Drinker Biddle & Reath LLP https://tvresortmarina.com/campground-owned-by-for-profit-llc-and-used-by-boy-scouts-of-america-qualifies-for-100-property-tax-exemption-in-indiana-faegre-drinker-biddle-reath-llp/ Tue, 04 Jan 2022 17:03:02 +0000 https://tvresortmarina.com/campground-owned-by-for-profit-llc-and-used-by-boy-scouts-of-america-qualifies-for-100-property-tax-exemption-in-indiana-faegre-drinker-biddle-reath-llp/ A taxpayer does not have to be a not-for-profit corporation in order for their property to qualify for the Indiana charitable exemption. The Indiana Board of Tax Review confirmed this in a final ruling issued on November 9, 2021 in Wildwood Forest, LLC vs. Vigo County Assessor. In this case, the county council denied a […]]]>

A taxpayer does not have to be a not-for-profit corporation in order for their property to qualify for the Indiana charitable exemption. The Indiana Board of Tax Review confirmed this in a final ruling issued on November 9, 2021 in Wildwood Forest, LLC vs. Vigo County Assessor. In this case, the county council denied a property tax exemption for Camp Wildwood. The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) previously owned the campground. In 2017, faced with financial problems, BSA sought to sell the property. A former local Scout, concerned that the loss of the campground would hurt local Scouting, formed an LLC (of which he was the only member) and purchased the property in 2020.

The LLC allows BSA to use the campground free of charge for activities such as camping, leadership training, and other Scouting events. No other third party has been authorized to use the property. The appraiser objected to an exemption for the property as of the valuation date of January 1, 2021, arguing that the LLC is a private, for-profit entity “that can do whatever it wants with the property. , at any time ”. Further, the appraiser claimed that the use of the property only benefits BSA and not the rest of the community.

The Commission summarized the charitable exemption:

Indiana Code § 6-1.1-10-16 (a) provides an exemption for all or part of a building that belongs to, and is exclusively or primarily used and occupied, for educational, literary, scientific, religious or charitable purposes. LC. § 6-l.1-10-16 (a); LC. § 6-l.1-10-36.3 (a), (c). The exemption generally extends to the land on which the building is located and to personal property owned and used in such a way that it would be exempt if it were a building. IC § 6-ll-10-16 (c), (e). Unity of ownership, occupation and use by a single entity is not required. But each entity must have its own exempt lens. Once these three elements are combined, it does not matter by whom, the good is entitled to the exemption.

(citing Hamilton Cnty. Prop. App tax assessment Bd. v. Oaken Bucket Partners, LLC, 938 NE2d 654, 657 (Ind. 2010) (emphasis added)).

Council noted that “no one seriously disputes that BSA used Camp Wildwood for exemption purposes. And the LLC “owned the property only to facilitate the exempt purposes of BSA.” That the LLC wants to block the development of the property does not disqualify it from the exemption; rather the former scout / single member “didn’t want the property to be developed because he was committed to maintaining a campground where young men and women could continue the scouting activities that he and his family had been supporting ever since. so long “. The LLC owned the campground to facilitate BSA exempt activities, not to make a profit. “Because the property was owned, occupied and used exclusively for exempt purposes,” the Commission found it to be 100% exempt.


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